ICBC and Massage Therapy – what changed after April 1st?

As of April 1st, 2019 ICBC made some serious changes to all of their programs and how paramedical providers such as Registered Massage Therapists interact with them. Many of these changes have been financially beneficial to the client, making the burden of after-accident medical care a little easier. So what changed? What does the new system look like now?

Here is a rundown on the changes and what it means to you and us:

Fees and Payments

Previously ICBC paid only $23 directly to a massage therapist, with the patient having to privately pay the remainder of their treatment and give that receipt to their adjuster for reimbursement. Now, ICBC pays $107 for the first assessment treatment, and $80 for the remaining treatments. This is paid directly to the massage therapist by ICBC. This does not necessarily cover the cost of the entire treatment received, nor is ICBC legislating that this is to be the required total cost of the treatment. If your treatment cost is not covered by the amount ICBC pays, you’ll need to pay the remaining amount privately, or if you have private insurance (Manulife, Blue Cross, etc.) we can discuss billing the remaining amount of the treatment to your insurance plan. ICBC will no longer be offering reimbursement by adjustor for receipts for any remaining costs. Because of these changes we now offer a new 40 minute treatment for ICBC patients who don’t want to pay out of pocket.

Visits Available

ICBC gives you 12 visits to a massage therapist up front without requiring a doctor’s note, to be completed within 12 weeks of the date of your motor vehicle accident. If your massage therapist and you together agree that you would benefit from additional treatments, we’re able to request an extension from ICBC. It is not promised that we will receive one.

Reporting

While massage therapists are not required to make the type of steady reports other paramedical providers are, we are required to provide formal discharge at the end of treatment and provide ICBC with information related to your discharge. During your treatment it is not unusual for an adjuster to check-in on your progress and see what the massage therapist’s opinion is.

Billing

ICBC has introduced a brand new online application called the Health Care Provider Invoicing and Reporting (HCPIR). Previously invoices were hand-written or filled in online via a pdf form and faxed (eventually changed to e-mail) to ICBC for submission. This new portal allows us to do everything digitally, including requests for treatment extensions and filling out our discharge information.

All of the new rules and information can be found on ICBC’s website by clicking this link.

We are all set up with the new system and have been using it effectively.

What do you need to bring to us if you’ve had a car accident, and have an ICBC claim? Please inform the person booking your appointment of the following: your date of motor vehicle accident, your claim number, and your adjuster’s information if you have it. Whether you are a new patient or an existing patient, the first treatment in after an MVA will be used to assess the situation, discuss a treatment plan, and begin implementing it. During this process please be completely frank with your massage therapist about what you are feeling, what body changes happen, and how your body feels during and after treatment, and in the days between your next treatment. We look forward to being a partner in your care!

Welcoming Miriam Panert!

We are excited to welcome our newest RMT to the Ethel Street Therapeutic family starting December 3rd. Miriam joins us after graduating in 2017 from the Okanagan Valley College of Massage Therapy. She found her passion for massage therapy after seeing the help it gave her family, and receiving its benefits herself when she was in need.

She is accepting new patients and will start out on Mondays and Wednesdays, 9 am to 7 pm.

Please join us in welcoming her by calling and booking an appointment!

Amy Fairman now serves a variety of insurances!

Our newest RMT is dedicated to making sure that she can provide treatment to a wide variety of patients, and has worked diligently to make sure she’s partnered with government health and private insurance plans to meet required needs. So what can she do?

Amy is a registered ICBC provider, so if you’ve been in a car accident and have an ICBC claim she is able to bill part of your visit to your ICBC claim.

She is a registered MSP provider with Health Insurance BC! If you get assistance with your health premiums, you may be eligible for MSP to cover a portion of 10 of your visits per year.

She is a registered Blue Cross provider! Blue Cross handles government affairs such as the RCMP and Department of Veteran’s Affairs, so Amy is equipped to bill to Blue Cross for RCMP and Veteran treatment. She can also bill Blue Cross for private insurance!

Not on the list? Don’t worry, Amy has registered with many other insurance companies and is in the process of finalizing those accounts. Ask the office and we can let you know how far out it is before we can direct bill to your insurance. In the meantime why not come in for a first appointment and get set up!

Welcoming a new RMT to our clinic!

We are very excited to be able to welcome a wonderful new RMT to our clinic, Amy Fairman. She has six years experience as an RMT, and spent most of her career working Ontario where she received her education. She moved to BC over a year ago and has gone through the rigorous licensing process to be able to practice as an RMT in BC. She is experienced, talented, and ready to build her practice! (And has received the clinic cat stamp of approval!)

Right now she is starting her practice Mondays and Thursdays, 10 am to 7 pm, with a look to increase those hours as demand dictates.

Call, e-mail, or message us on Facebook to book your next appointment with Amy!